>
Colonial Williamsburg®

History.org: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation's Official History and Citizenship Website

CW Foundation navigation

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Page content
Reset text sizeResize text larger

Rare Breeds and Other Creatures

photography by Dave Doody

text by Barbara Brown

Rare Leicester longwool lambs

Rare Leicester longwool lambs with their dams eye a visitor to their Historic Area pasture.

ANIMALS ARE as much a part of domestic life at Colonial Williamsburg today as they were in the eighteenth-century city. Animals plow fields, pull carriages, lay eggs, give milk, and serve for pets—and some end up on the dinner table.

Through them, Historic Area guests learn about the usefulness and adaptability of livestock, and how the institution's rare breeds program helps preserve the bloodlines of uncommon horses, sheep, poultry, and the like. Richard Nicoll, director of coach and livestock, suggested a book of photographs of them. Abigail Schumann arranged sessions for photographers David Doody, Tom Green, Barbara Lombardi, Kelly Mihalcoe, and Lael White.

Animals don't respond to requests to smile or look at the camera, and watching one's step in their domains is prudent. Patience is the virtue most required, but an eye for the unexpected is important, too. A photo shoot set up to capture horses yielded an unplanned shot of the stable cat, Tigger, stalking a mouse.

Presented here are a few of the photos selected for inclusion in the just-out volume Link to the Past, Bridge to the Future: Colonial Williamsburg's Animals. Written by John P. Hunter, it is available at www.williamsburgmarketplace.com.

Sometime milkmaid and
interpreter Carrie MacDougall churns butter while Spring, a Milking
Devon, looks on.

Sometime milkmaid and interpreter Carrie MacDougall churns butter while Spring, a Milking Devon, looks on.

American Cream draft horse Mama and her foal Ben

American Cream draft horse Mama and her foal Ben romp in a dogwood-shaded field.

interpreter Robert Watson and twins DeVonte and DeAndre Short fish in a duck pond

Demonstrating one of the ways colonials and animals interacted, interpreter Robert Watson and twins DeVonte and DeAndre Short fish in a duck pond.

Interpreter Edward Merkley and his greyhound Heather

Interpreter Edward Merkley and his greyhound Heather strike a hunting pose beside a wood at Colonial Williamsburg's Carter's Grove plantation.

Brenda Rosseau, supervisor of research and design

Brenda Rosseau, supervisor of research and design at the costume center, with Spike.

Interpreter Lee Peters and his beagle Sally

Interpreter Lee Peters and his dog Sally portray a hunter home from an eighteenth-century hunt.

A wild pigeon finds a roost at the Wythe House dovecote.

A wild pigeon finds a roost at the Wythe House dovecote.

A young Ossabaw Island pig

A young Ossabaw Island pig muddies his snout at Great Hopes Plantation.

Richard Nicoll, director of coach and livestock, enjoys a James River sunset
with horse Pete.

Richard Nicoll, director of coach and livestock, enjoys a James River sunset with horse Pete.

Colonial Williamsburg's Lightning, a dunghill fowl,

Colonial Williamsburg's Lightning, a dunghill fowl, crows over the Wythe House backyard.




slideshow
The Animals of the Historic Area Slideshow

For further reading:



Footer