>
Colonial Williamsburg®

History.org: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation's Official History and Citizenship Website

CW Foundation navigation

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Page content
Reset text sizeResize text larger

December 29, 2009

Begin the New Year with CW's winter programs

Colonial Williamsburg launches the New Year with a variety of entertaining and informative indoor winter programs that are sure to satisfy the history and theater buff’s appetite. Programs in the Historic Area include:

  • The Player and the Pulpit —12:30 p.m. on Jan. 19, 26, Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23 and March 2 and 9, Raleigh Tavern. Is the theater a moral academy or the devil’s chapel? It’s the church vs. the stage! Hear sermons and letters from both sides brought to life as fiery rhetoric and comic quips meet head to head.
  • “and went to the play…”—12:30 p.m. on Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24 and March 3 and 10, Raleigh Tavern. Experience the theater that entertained and inspired George Washington, one of our most famous revolutionary leaders.
  • A Bit of the Bard—2:30 p.m. on Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24 and March 3 and 10, Mary Stith House. Shakespeare was a favorite of actors and audiences in the colonies just as he was in England. Enjoy this lively look at the bard—18th-century style.
  • Fops, Rogues & Villains—11:45 a.m. on Jan. 7, 14, 21, 28, Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25 and March 4 and 11, Raleigh Tavern. The theater of the colonial era was often advertised as a “moral academy” where the audience could learn from the characters on stage. Not all characters, however, were role models. The 18th-century stage was full of scheming, backstabbing and intrigue.
  • Words of War—12:30 p.m. on Jan. 8, 15, 22, 29, Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26 and March 5 and 12, Raleigh Tavern. Poetry, political pieces, liberty songs and dances with military titles were important propaganda tools to promote the cause of liberty before and during the Revolutionary War years. Hear the words that helped a generation of men and women to build this new nation.
  • Drive the Cold Winter Away—11:45 a.m. on Jan. 8, 15, 22, 29, Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26 and March 5 and 12, Raleigh Tavern. Join the Performing Arts Department as they bring to life music, dancing and theatrical readings enjoyed by the people of 18th-century Williamsburg.
  • Theater and the Road to Revolution—12:30 p.m. on Jan. 9, 16, 23, 30, Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27 and March 6 and 13, Raleigh Tavern. Learn how the theater made its voice heard before and during the Revolutionary War. Topics vary daily and include George Washington’s connection with the theater, women’s contributions to the war and printed propaganda.
  • In the Parlour—10:30 a.m. on Feb. 11, 16, 18, 23, 25 and March 2, 4, 9 and 11, Raleigh Tavern. A woman’s domain was her parlor, and it was there that she spent her time engaged in the skills necessary to be considered both amiable and accomplished. Tea, poetry, music and dance—join us as we discover the world of the 18th-century woman.

    A Colonial Williamsburg admission ticket or a Good Neighbor Card is required to enjoy these programs.

    Established in 1926, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is the not-for-profit educational institution that preserves and operates the restored 18th-century Revolutionary capital of Virginia as a town-sized living history museum, telling the inspirational stories of our nation’s founding men and women. Williamsburg is located in Virginia’s Tidewater region, 20 minutes from Newport News, within an hour’s drive of Richmond and Norfolk, and 150 miles south of Washington, D.C., off Interstate 64. For more information about Colonial Williamsburg, call 1-800-HISTORY or visit Colonial Williamsburg’s Web site at www.history.org.

    Media Contact:
    Penna Rogers
    (757) 220-7121



  • Footer