Ornamental Separator

Navajo Weavings: Adapting Tradition

Now Open in the Guyton Gallery.
This exhibition is on view in the Guyton Gallery through December 2022
The exhibition is generously funded by an anonymous donor.


Featuring a display of Navajo weavings never exhibited here before, this small exhibition will highlight six pieces on loan from the collection of American folk art enthusiasts Pat and Rex Lucke.

A longstanding cultural and artistic tradition passed down for generations, anonymous Navajo women created brilliantly colored, boldly designed pictorial weavings on hand looms. They adapted and modified their work based on the changing world around them, creating an art form that is uniquely theirs and providing insight into the Navajo culture in the first half of the 20th century. A traditional chief-style blanket woven in the late 19th century, for example, will contrast with the creative and innovative designs Navajo women incorporated into their weavings in the 20th century.

Through the woven motifs of these textiles, museum guests can learn what was important to the makers among the Diné (the term the Navajo use to refer to themselves meaning “the People”) and gain a sense of their aspirations.

Pictorial Weaving: Horses, Cows, Eagles, and Chicken Serape, Navajo Nation, 1875-1885. On loan from Rex and Pat Lucke
Chief’s Blanket, Classic First Phase, The Navajo Nation, 1840-1860. On loan from Rex and Pat Lucke.
Pictorial Weaving: Shiprock, Navajo Nation, ca. 1920. On loan from Rex and Pat Lucke
Pictorial Weaving: Dr. Pepper, Navajo Nation, ca. 1950. On Loan from Rex and Pat LuckePictorial Weaving: Red Train, Navajo Nation,1890-1915. On loan from Rex and Pat Lucke

Pictorial Weaving: American Flag, The Navajo Nation, 1900-1910. On loan from Rex and Pat Lucke.
Pictorial Weaving: Red Train, Navajo Nation,1890-1915. On loan from Rex and Pat Lucke